The Devil’s Triangle.

Posted: July 7, 2013 in Urban legends
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The Bermuda Triangle, also known as the Devil’s Triangle, is an undefined region in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean where a number of aircraft and ships are said to have disappeared under mysterious circumstances. The triangle does not exist according to the US Navy and the name is not recognized by the US Board on Geographic Names.[1] Popular culture has attributed various disappearances to the paranormal or activity by extraterrestrial beings. Documented evidence indicates that a significant percentage of the incidents were spurious, inaccurately reported, or embellished by later authors. In a 2013 study the World Wide Fund for Nature identified the world’s 10 most dangerous waters for shipping, but the Bermuda Triangle was not among them. Contrary to popular belief, insurance companies do not charge higher premiums for shipping in this area. 

There are many different theories about the Bermuda Triangle, here are some:

1: Human Error

The Bermuda Triangle’s tropical weather and crystal blue water make it prime aviation stomping ground for everyone from veteran pilots to Navy sailors to amateurs looking to play around.

There’s a lot of traffic in the area, and when you add in the turbulent weather patterns, swift currents and a landscape composed of a lot of similar-looking islands, it can be really easy to lose one’s way. Once you’re a little way off, it’s only a few more wrong turns until you’re really far askew: far, far away from a place to refuel or wait out tough weather.

In short, you’re a disaster just waiting to happen … and, judging from the Triangle’s history, you’re not alone.

 

2: Magnetic Fields. 

We’ve all heard myths about compasses in the Bermuda Triangle spinning wildly out of control. Legend has held that the Bermuda Triangle is one of only two places on the planet where a compass points true north, as opposed to the magnetic north.

Now, navigators know that a compass must be calibrated to compensate for the deviation depending on the location on the globe. While the Bermuda Triangle was once, during the 19th century, a place where a compass pointed true north with no variation, the Earth’s magnetic field is constantly changing, and along with it, compass variations.

These days, the Bermuda Triangle does not sit in any kind of strange magnetic area, and pilots and sailors know well to adjust their compasses to compensate for the variation, called declination, between magnetic north and true north. There are plenty of charts to help them out with that.

 

3: Atlantis 

For those of you who believe in the legendary underwater city of Atlantis, this one may actually hold some water (no pun intended).

Those who believe Atlantis once lay deep beneath the Bermuda Triangle argue that the remnants of the intense energy crystals that were once used to fuel the city are now interfering with airplane and ship electronics, causing them to go haywire.

Their proof? Sometime in 1970, a scuba-diving Atlantis proponent claims he found a mirrored pyramid of some type, deep under the Atlantic, somewhere around the Bahamas.

Um …well, yeah, if he really did find that, then, sure, most likely something’s going on…but the guy seems to have forgotten his underwater camera, let us say.

Other theorists have even more evidence, pointing to what they say is obvious, more easily seen evidence: the Bimini Road, a strange rock formation composed of uniform, seemingly sculpted towers of rock just of the coast of the Bahamian island of Bimini.

The Atlantis proponents claim it was once a dock; geologists claim it’s the work of natural forces.

Hmm…so, naturally occurring, interesting-to-look-at rock formation or underwater port? You be the judge.

 

4: UFOs/Aliens

A downed spaceship lurking deep underwater, its dangerous alien mechanics interfering with our own technology? Perhaps. Or perhaps the Bermuda Triangle, along with another similarly rumored triangle in the Pacific off the coast of Japan, serves as a portal for interplanetary, interdimensional creatures.

Not kidding.

That’s the theory.

This particular myth holds that human ships and planes, when caught in the portal at the wrong time, end up trapped in between dimensions – it’s all just an unintentional by-product of your average day-to-day alien interplanetary, interdimensional, time portal transport.

And you thought your commute was dangerous.

 

5: The Government. 

That darn government.

They really are out to get us, aren’t they? And they’re so secretive about it.

Forget Area 51; they call this base AUTEC (for Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center). It’s located on the Bahamas’ Andros Island, right in the middle of the Bermuda Triangle, and it’s where the Navy tests out subs, weapons and sonar…but some people think that’s not all they test out.

A handful of theorists insist that our government has been working with extraterrestrials and that AUTEC is actually a testing ground for reverse-engineered alien technology.

Might this advanced alien technology be powerful enough to down planes?

 

6: Methane 

Deep beneath the surface of the Bermuda Triangle lie pockets of trapped methane gas, just waiting to be unlocked by seismic activity or underwater landslides. If unleashed, the theory goes, this methane gas could bubble to the surface, reducing the density of the water.

Any ship in that patch of water would lose its buoyancy and sink perilously. It gets worse: In theory, if enough of the flammable gas bubbled up to the surface and got high, high, high up into the air, it could potentially stall an airplane engine or even be ignited by an engine’s spark.

It’s important to note that the Bermuda Triangle is far from the only place on the planet where methane hydrates exist – it’s not even the area with the highest concentration – but it is possible that these hydrates could pose a threat.

Now, would their eruption be powerful and forceful enough to sink a ship or down a plane? We’ll leave that one up to you.

 

Taken from http://www.science.discovery.com

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